2014 bitcoin obituary
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“Sorry, libertarians: Your dream of a Bitcoin paradise is officially dead and gone” – Salon | $637.77

Neither Satoshi Nakamoto nor Bitcoin ever stood any chance of operating outside the bounds of conventional society. There will be regulation, there will be consumer protection, there will be rules and taxes, and criminal prosecutions for those who break the law. Bitcoin isn’t cyberpunk fantasy and it isn’t a Thomas Pynchon novel. It’s dull. The thrill is gone. And that’s why people are so mad.

2014 bitcoin obituary
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“Bitcoin is (Nearly) Dead” – Acton | $672.22

Opinions are still divided, but the evidence that Bitcoin is doomed to failure piles up almost every day. . . . Of course, we Bitcoin doomsayers have been waiting for the bubble to pop for some time now. We also tend to think that every new drop is a sign of it’s impending doom. . . . Anyone still willing to bet a Bitcoin on the future of Bitcoin?

2014 bitcoin obituary
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“Bitcoin Is Dead” – The Weekly Standard | $672.22

All of which is why I’m convinced that while bitcoin (or something like it) is likely to hang around as a niche commodity for certain kinds of gray- and black-market transactions, Mt. Gox pretty much assures that the average consumer will never use it. Because there is no way for you to ever ensure that your bitcoins are completely safe. . . . The speculators may not realize it yet, but you can stick a fork in bitcoin. It’s done.

2014 bitcoin obituary
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“Bitcoin is Dead” – Street Insider | $578.98

Bitcoin’s market cap on paper by far exceeds that of the competition, but the ability to translate Bitcoin wealth to wealth in other forms is very limited. There are many Bitcoin holders heavily invested in Bitcoin’s success and it has a first mover advantage. However as a store of value, its only value is reputational, and recent developments have shaken that reputation.

2014 bitcoin obituary
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“Is Bitcoin Dead?” – About.com | $532.71

But does this one significant report of Bitcoin failure mean that the virtual currency is doomed to failure? I am no Bitcoin expert but I do know that any given currency is rooted in belief, which is then supported by faith in the issuing entity. Therefore, once the belief or faith is gone, the currency is gone. Thus far, in the opinion of your humble author, Bitcoin is nothing more than illusion.

2014 bitcoin obituary
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“Why Bitcoin Is Doomed as a Currency” – Fool.com | $821.39

The part where you run in to trouble is getting governments to accept tax revenue as Bitcoin, because it undermines the national currency, making monetary policy irrelevant. And why would a country do that exactly? Why would they surrender the ability to heal their economy? Sorry to all the believers, but it’s a Libertarian pipe dream that makes absolutely no sense.

2014 bitcoin obituary
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“An early obituary for bitcoin” – Reuters | $821.79

Bitcoin is the wrong answer to a good question: what can be done to make the monetary system less crazy? . . . Bitcoin is not over yet. But the pseudo-currency is close enough to collapse to merit an early retrospective. . . . Bitcoin is neither a relatable store of value nor a helpful unit of account.

2014 bitcoin obituary
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“One Thing You Can Bank On: The Bitcoin Currency Is Doomed” – Valley News | $798.02

Sorry, but Bitcoin isn’t the future. If anything, it’s a throwback to an earlier era. . . . Anyone who thinks that Bitcoin will triumph has to believe that it will succeed where earlier generations of private currencies failed — that Bitcoin will, improbably, manage to overthrow more than century’s worth of accumulated state power, jealously guarded and ruthlessly enforced. That’s a preposterous fantasy — and a dangerous one, if you’re an investor.

2013 bitcoin obituary
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“Bitcoin Will Crash To $10 By Mid-2014” – Business Insider | $887.63

Bitcoin is not a legitimate currency but simply a risky virtual commodity bet. . . . Bitcoin lacks the essential attributes that are needed to support a widely recognized transactional currency. If Bitcoin was allowed to proliferate as a currency it would produce greater economic uncertainty, reduced trade and lower individual standard of living.

2013 bitcoin obituary
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“Once You Use Bitcoin You Can’t Go ‘Back’ — And That’s Its Fatal Flaw” – Wired | $835.11

And, in the greater scheme of things, bitcoin is small: even at a roughly 10 billion dollar market capitalization it is almost irrelevant in financial terms. This is probably roughly the peak market capitalization achieved by Beanie Babies in 1999. There are indeed important and valuable ideas that exist in bitcoin’s design. But bitcoin itself? I believe its volatility and built-in irreversibility will doom it to the ash-heap of history.

2013 bitcoin obituary
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“How bitcoin is going to fail and why it is not a gold equivalent” – Fester’s Den | $787.05

The federal reserve comes out with their own version of the bitcoin, let’s call it the “USDcoin”, they make a .001 (or some other arbitrary number) USDc the equivalent of $1 and they make it very easy to use. You can have these deposited into your existing bank account and they are immediately converted to dollars and when you send dollars out of your account they are immediately converted to USDc. Then the government also implements anti-bitcoin laws that make using bitcoin difficult or impossible to use. Of course they will claim bitcoin was being used for illegal purposes and money laundering. This will be the end of bitcoin.

2013 bitcoin obituary
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“Bitcoin Is A Joke” – Business Insider | $433.57

But make no mistake, Bitcoin is not the currency of the future. It has no intrinsic value. . . . Bitcoin? Nada. There’s nothing keeping it being a thing. . . . Again, Bitcoin might go up a lot more before it ultimately ends. That’s the nature of bubbles. The dotcom bubble crashed a bunch of times on its way up. Then one day it ended. The same will happen with this.

2013 bitcoin obituary
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“Bitcoin Is A Remarkable Innovation, Here’s Why It Will Fail” – Salon | $145.16

In theory, bitcoin could become a lawful virtual currency if the bitcoin community gave up anonymity and therefore incorporated the identities of bitcoin senders and receivers as part of the currency. But that would eliminate the cash-like feature that makes bitcoin attractive and vastly decrease the demand for bitcoin. That does not seem like a viable path forward. . . . While I praise the sheer ingenuity of bitcoin and its payments innovation, it should be buried.

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